WHO and ITU launch new guide on introduction of dementia risk reduction and carer support programmes using mobile technology

WHO’s new mDementia handbook[SF1] [BAR2] , launched today, will help countries to introduce and scale up dementia mHealth programmes (delivered through mobile devices, such as phones and tablets). The handbook and accompanying mHealth programme content includes a module on reducing the risk of dementia and another on support for carers of people with dementia. The handbook was developed by the WHO Mental Health and Substance Use Department and Be He@lthy Be Mobile (BHBM), a joint initiative between the World Health Organization and the International Telecommunications Union.

<p>WHO&rsquo;s new mDementia handbook, launched today, will help countries to introduce and scale up dementia mHealth programmes (delivered through mobile devices, such as phones and tablets). The handbook and accompanying mHealth programme content includes a module on reducing the risk of dementia and another on support for carers of people with dementia. The handbook was developed by the WHO Mental Health and Substance Use Department and BeHe@lthy BeMobile (BHBM), a joint initiative between the World Health Organization and the International Telecommunications Union. </p><p>The first of the modules, mDementionPrevention, aims to encourage people who are middle-aged or older to manage modifiable risk factors, such as physical inactivity, tobacco use, unhealthy diets and harmful use of alcohol, to delay the onset or slow the progression of dementia. The second module, DementiaSupport, is based on WHO&rsquo;s skills and knowledge training programme for carers of people with dementia, iSupport. It provides tailored support to address the physical and mental health impacts associated with caring for people with dementia. </p><p>The mDementia Handbook outlines how an mHealth programme can be used to strengthen existing dementia prevention and carer support programmes. It sets out the steps and considerations for successfully implementing mDementia at scale. The content can be adapted to support countries&rsquo; own national guidelines and existing health system interventions and to the local context and culture.</p><div><div><div id="_com_1" language="JavaScript"><p>&nbsp;</p></div></div><div><div id="_com_2" language="JavaScript"><p>&nbsp;</p></div></div></div>

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Human infection with avian influenza A (H5N8) – the Russian Federation

Sab Feb 27 , 2021
On 18 February 2021, the National IHR Focal Point for the Russian Federation notified WHO of detection of avian influenza A(H5N8) in seven human clinical specimens. These are the first reported detection of avian influenza A(H5N8) in humans. Positive clinical specimens were collected from poultry farm workers who participated in a response operation to contain an avian influenza A(H5N8) outbreak detected in a poultry farm in Astrakhan Oblast in the Russian Federation. The laboratory confirmation of the seven specimens were performed by the State Research Centre for Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR (WHO H5 Reference Laboratory). The age of seven positive cases ranged between 29 to 60 years and five were female. <br> <br> Between 3 and 11 December, a total of 101 000 of 900 000 egg laying hens on the farm died. This high mortality rate prompted an investigation. Samples were collected from these birds and an initial detection of avian influenza A(H5N8) was performed by the Russian regional veterinary laboratory. On 11 December, the outbreak was confirmed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Reference laboratory, and the Federal Centre for Animal Health (FGBI-ARRIAH), in Vladimir, the Russian Federation. Outbreak containment operations started immediately and continued for several days due to the large size of the poultry farm.